6 Facts About Dogs Everyone Thinks Are True

Dog Training Tips and Tricks: Understanding Crate Training

A crate is a home for dogs to sleep, eat, hide from danger and a place to raise a family, wherein crate training is primarily used for house training, taking advantage of your dog’s natural instincts as a den animal. A dog crate is a dog’s den, providing solitude and comfort in a crate, making it their own den, knowing they are safe and secure. Crates come in various types such as plastic called “flight kennels”, fabric on a rigid frame that is also collapsible, and metal pens. Crates come in various sizes, colors and can be bought at most pet supply catalogs and pet supply tores.

One of the things you need to know about crates is that it should never be used as a form of punishment, because eventually, your dog may refuse to enter because of fear. Do not leave dogs in crates for too long periods of time, because it can result to anxiousness and depression due to lack of human interaction and lack of physical exercise. Changing your schedule, hiring a pet sitter or taking your dog to a daycare facility is very helpful in reducing the amount of time they spend in their crates. Six months and below puppies should not stay in their crates for more than three to four hours at a time, because they can’t control their bowels and bladders for that long. Crate your dog if you think they will not destroy their house, and eventually they will enter voluntarily without pressure.

Crate is an effective short-term tool for the training and managing of your dog. Crate training allows you to provide a safe way to transport your dog and travel with him to friend’s homes, motels, when on vacation and other gatherings. Crate training helps you in introducing your new dog in your household, preventing them from being destructive. Crate training may take days up to weeks, depending on the dog’s age, past experiences and temperament, so it is important to ensure that the training should always be associated with something that is pleasant and it should take in small steps. The first step is introducing your dog to the crate, put a soft blanket or towel, allowing the door open, and let your dog explore the crate with their preferred time and pacing. Bring your dog over the crate, and then talk to them with a calm and happy tone of voice, making sure the door is open and secured, to prevent your dog from being frightened. To encourage your dog to enter the crate, drop some small food treats nearby, inside the door and finally the way inside the crate, but do not force them to enter, instead allow them to slowly enter and lie comfortably, without undue stress and pressure.

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